Why they are attacking the Monarchy

Published in Expansión

“Lies are a constituent part of our government; they are its essential framework”. These words of Solzhenitsyn referring to the Soviet communist dictatorship are perfectly applicable to Spain’s social-communist government that is eating away at the constitutional order in an unprecedented attack on the institutions. I will repeat until I’m hoarse that we are faced with a dangerous, subversive government that leans towards despotism, and the weakening of the monarchy is an essential part of a regime change agenda. It is curious that there are still those who believe that the monarchy is a superfluous institution: if that were the case, why do its enemies invest so much energy in trying to overthrow it?

It is a mistake to believe that the campaign to discredit the institution is a banal smokescreen aimed at distracting from the calamitous government mismanagement of the pandemic and the economic and social nightmare that it is creating because it is not an innocuous smoke, but a lethal gas. Neither should we fall into the trap of focusing on the battering ram (those “past events” of the life of King Emeritus Juan Carlos) and not on the real objective of those who are pushing it, which is none other than to force de facto the gates of the constitutional system. This is not about discussing theoretical disquisitions on one or another form of State with anachronistic romanticisms that hardly ring the bell of the youth and tend to defend the indefensible. The battle for the monarchy, here and now, is in reality the battle for Spain, for the rule of law and for freedom. The one who has perceived this most clearly is former socialist PM Felipe Gonzalez.

From the facts it is deduced that those who attack the monarchy belong to a multicolored gang apparently led, outrageously, by the PM and second deputy PM of the Spanish government, Mr. Sanchez and Mr. Iglesias, the same ones who promised “for their conscience and honor (…), loyalty to the king” in the oath by which they took office. You will agree with me that, in this case, the foundations of said promise (the conscience and the honor) are weak, but the issue is extremely serious, not in vain that the Dictionary of the Royal Academy defines treason as “a fault committed by breaking the loyalty that should be kept”. It is important to emphasize that Sanchez and Iglesias form a tandem and that the apparent distribution of roles (bad cop, good cop) is only a deception. Both share a broad ideological intersection, a fascist-like will to power and a project of national deconstruction. Both are also natural allies of nationalism, that stale phenomenon from nineteenth-century Romanticism which, according to its own legendary whining, has always failed in the assault on the Spanish fortress (the very definition of losers), but which now finds an opportunity in the complicity of those who, far from defending the walls, seek a way to leave a gate open to the attackers.

Well-known scholars have recently defended the Spanish monarchy with solid arguments. There is no politician in Spain capable of uniting Spaniards like the king, and as we saw on October 3rd 2017, a politically neutral head of state focused on defending Spain has its advantages. Remember that on the night of the violent, illegal, deceitful and seditious October 1st Catalan referendum, the then center-right Spanish PM Rajoy was still appealing for “dialogue”, and then delayed the king’s galvanizing, strong and extraordinary speech in defense of the rule of law two days later and took a long time to underwrite it publicly, since a head of state independent of political power makes the latter uncomfortable, regardless of ideology. Imagine the alarm felt by the subversives at the time.

The fundamental arguments in favor of the monarchy are indispensable, but I believe that the first line of defense of the institution should be attached to the reality of the here and now: to the Spain of 2020, to the specific person of King Philip and to the motives that move those who today attack it in such an indecent manner, motives that have nothing to do with scandals or “democracy”, but with the lust for power, the subversion of the legal order and the aversion to Spain.

The Nationalists have obvious motives for attacking the monarchy: according to the Constitution, the king is the “symbol of the unity and permanence” of that Spain that they are trying to break and destroy, and the main guarantor of “the indissoluble unity of the Spanish Nation”, whose very existence they deny (hence they only speak of the “Spanish State”).

The motives of Deputy PM Iglesias, a Bolivarian communist who seems oddly out of place in a European government and an advocate of impoverishing banana tyrannies (like Maduro’s Venezuela) and of the guillotine (“an instrument of democratic justice”, in his own words), are probably his resentful nostalgia for that bloody anarchy called the Second Republic (1931-1936) and his Leninism, which gives prime importance to the control of those who have the guns (the police and the Army). He has quoted Mao (“power is born from the mouths of guns”) and asserted that “no political project can be built and endure without the backing of devices capable of ensuring the use of force when necessary”. Given that, according to the Constitution, “the King is the commander-in-chief of the Armed Forces” which must “defend the national integrity and the constitutional order”, and that the oath of the Civil Guard and the Army includes “to guard and make keep the Constitution (…), to obey and respect the King and your chiefs (…) and never to abandon them”, it is easy to understand that the monarchy is an obstacle.

The motives of Sanchez, the alleged leader of the attack on the institution according to all indications and to his eloquent silences, would be similar to those of Iglesias in terms of ideological sympathies and lust for power, but if in Iglesias the road to power is Leninism, in Sánchez it is simple cynicism, with a nuance: his actions should always be judged on the basis of the worrying psychological traits he exhibits. Probably Sanchez does not tolerate that when he asks the magic mirror “am I the most beautiful of all?” it answers that King Philip enjoys an international prestige he could never dream of and has far greater stature, rank, education, integrity and popularity. Remember that 72% of Spaniards did not want Sanchez as president, even after he lied about his intentions to ally himself with communists and separatists (in which case his support would have been even lower). All this is a torment for any narcissist, a personality that is characterized, moreover, by what psychiatrists call “revenge gratification”.

Whether you are a follower of one political party or another, have vague monarchical or republican ideals, feel you belong to the center, the right or the  left (moderate), live in the north, of south, of east or of west of Spain, do not be deceived. The battle of the monarchy is about making simple choices: a first-rate head of state, exquisitely neutral, enormously respected inside and outside the country and defender of the common good and not of partisan interests, or a head of state colonized by the corrupt political parties and personified by politicians of little stature; the unity and permanence of this old country called Spain, full of scars and yet so beloved, or the end of the oldest nation in Europe, as desired by its enemies at home and abroad; law, order and democratic freedom, or a third-world Bolivarian regime in which the Leninist controls the guns and the one with the magic mirror is finally satisfied with his despotic narcissism. In the Spain of 2020, these are the real options and no others. You’ve got to choose.

 

Fernando del Pino Calvo-Sotelo

www.fpcs.es

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